Women, weight and fertility

Posted by on November 10, 2012 in Fertility Facts | 0 comments

Women, weight, and fertility: the effect of body mass index on the outcome of superovulation/intrauterine insemination cycles.

Souter IBaltagi LMKuleta DMeeker JDPetrozza JC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21195401#

Source

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. isouter@partners.org

There was a significant trend toward higher medication requirements and lower E(2) levels with increasing BMI.

BMI was inversely associated with [1] the E(2) level per produced preovulatory follicle and [2] the number of medium-size follicles. Furthermore, BMI was inversely associated with the number of medium, large, and total follicles divided by total FSH dose, suggesting that women with a higher BMI develop a lower number of medium and/or large follicles at a given total FSH dose. BMI was positively associated with endometrial thickness, and endometrial thickness was positively associated with pregnancy. Mean number of cycles required to conceive, clinical pregnancy, and spontaneous abortion rates did not differ significantly among the different BMI categories.

CONCLUSION(S):

Obese women require higher doses of medication and produce fewer follicles for a given dose, but once medication and response are adjusted to overcome the weight effect, the success of the treatment cycle is comparable to that of normal weight women.

There was a significant trend toward higher medication requirements and lower E(2) levels with increasing BMI. BMI was inversely associated with [1] the E(2) level per produced preovulatory follicle and [2] the number of medium-size follicles. Furthermore, BMI was inversely associated with the number of medium, large, and total follicles divided by total FSH dose, suggesting that women with a higher BMI develop a lower number of medium and/or large follicles at a given total FSH dose. BMI was positively associated with endometrial thickness, and endometrial thickness was positively associated with pregnancy. Mean number of cycles required to conceive, clinical pregnancy, and spontaneous abortion rates did not differ significantly among the different BMI categories.

CONCLUSION(S):

Obese women require higher doses of medication and produce fewer follicles for a given dose, but once medication and response are adjusted to overcome the weight effect, the success of the treatment cycle is comparable to that of normal weight women.

 

 

In women, being overweight or obese is associated with impaired fertility and decreased chance of conception both in natural and assisted reproductive technology births. During pregnancy, overweight and obesity are associated with increased risk of adverse maternal and infant health outcomes. Attention to weight loss before conception may improve fertility and maternal and infant health outcomes during pregnancy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22108286#

 

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